THE WIT AND WISDOM OF MARY WHITEHOUSE

Mary Whitehouse stepped onto the public stage 50 years ago in 1964. To some she was the guardian of Christian family values, to others a self-appointed busybody. She spent decades campaigning for a responsible media and against harmful material. Ironically much of what we know about her views has come to us filtered by the media itself. This is Mary Whitehouse in her own words taken from the books she wrote during her lifetime.

October 2014

The real threat to broadcasting comes from those who resist the inevitable and evolutionary progression towards public participation and accountability.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“When sex is deformed, cheapened and exploited then the whole social fabric of society deteriorates.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Those who work in the media live in their own Cloud Cuckoo Land. Reality to them is the script, the studio, creating a close incestuous atmosphere in which the viewer in the home has no reality a is afforded therefore little consideration.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“So often the people who rightly castigate the brutality of the Vietnam War are found defending the sadistic in literature, film, stage & TV.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“People have both bodies and minds; our attitude to our own and to another person’s body will decide the quality of our relationships with them.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Collectively and publicly we have turned our backs on our responsibility to protect children’s right to childhood.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Those who control the channels of communication will hold history, and progress, by the throat.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“I find myself increasingly irritated by the realisation that in making a complaint I am not making my own voice heard but providing an opportunity for [Ofcom] to make a judgement on my views.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“The purpose of much of the sex we see on television and elsewhere is to titillate; and the children are a great deal more open about its effect than adults are.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“The greatest threat to us is that we shall become desensitised; that we shall no longer be moved by suffering, no longer capable of recognising the obscene.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Every parent, every teacher, every advertiser knows and builds on the fact that example teaches that the visual image is more powerful than the spoken word.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“The rights of parents to safeguard their homes and bring up their children as they think best are under attack.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“There is no way we can protect ourselves from the impact of television.”

Mightier Than the Sword, 1985

 

 

Advertisements

Comments are closed.