THE WIT AND WISDOM OF MARY WHITEHOUSE

Mary Whitehouse stepped onto the public stage 50 years ago in 1964. To some she was the guardian of Christian family values, to others a self-appointed busybody. She spent decades campaigning for a responsible media and against harmful material. Ironically much of what we know about her views has come to us filtered by the media itself. This is Mary Whitehouse in her own words taken from the books she wrote during her lifetime.


July 2014

“No group has practised censorship more rigidly that those who bellow for the abolition of all controls.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“Parliamentary accountability over this range of broadcasting is badly lacking.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“Those who refuse to acknowledge that films or television can affect human behaviour for better or worse might care to consider how film was used in the USA to desensitise troops sent out on combat or assault missions.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Behind the guile and, no doubt, deliberately created confusion lies a simple choice: it is between genuine freedom and total license, between cultural responsibility and cultural anarchy.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“In the world in which we live sex education is essential.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Violent entertainment plays an important and major role in teaching a culture of violence and distrust.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“As viewers we should not only ask ourselves ‘is this something that titillates my sense of humour’ but ‘what will these ideas do to the society in which I live?’”

Cleaning Up TV, 1967

“We are for what the BBC has done in the past and can do again… it is a public service… and as such should lead people on and up not down and out.”

Speaking in Birmingham, 1964

“It is dangerous to assume that the depiction of violence for legitimate ends is less harmful than depiction of violence for evil ends.”

A Most Dangerous Woman, 1982

“One wonders whether those responsible for making such films… ever do the simple thing; checking with others who have so much hard experience of the impact of the media on immediate social conditions.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

Those who silence by ridicule or limit the free expression of views they do not themselves hold are the real censors.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“Far from being a liberation pornography represents the primeval hideaway.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

 “Let a man go to hell in his own way say civil libertarians… but whom do they take with them and what rights do the victims have?”

Quite Contrary, 1993

 

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