THE WIT AND WISDOM OF MARY WHITEHOUSE

Mary Whitehouse stepped onto the public stage 50 years ago in 1964. To some she was the guardian of Christian family values, to others a self-appointed busybody. She spent decades campaigning for a responsible media and against harmful material. Ironically much of what we know about her views has come to us filtered by the media itself. This is Mary Whitehouse in her own words taken from the books she wrote during her lifetime.


June 2014

“The life we want to see reflected is so much brighter, more compassionate and more stimulating than the world in which you seek to contain us.”

A Most Dangerous Woman, 1982

“Mature people cannot only be concerned with rights, we carry responsibilities as well.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

On television: ‘the medium is impoverished by its own practitioners’.

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“I would defend everyone’s right to put down his ideas and experiences however turbulent or destructive these may be, the issue of control arises at the point when these are offered for public presentation.”

A Most Dangerous Woman, 1982

“That perennial justification for so much that cannot be justified – moral comment.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“The battle against any attempt to control pornography has seeped deep into our culture.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“The co-called ‘freedom’ of the sixties has been in effect a snare and a delusion.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“I have a dream: that broadcasters seek actively the knowledge of the impact of TV which is available throughout the land.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“We need to be particularly aware of the exploitation of the young by the violence in videos and in rock music.”

Mightier Than The Sword, 1985

“A theme which is fundamental to much now freely available pornography: woman is there to raped, she deserves to raped and raped she must be.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“We have no right to expect from our children standards of behaviour & attitudes of responsibility which we are not prepared to accept for ourselves.”

Educational Magazine, 1963

“Sex instruction was given by trained teachers; now it is being given by television, a medium which is responsible to nobody by itself.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“Vast resources, both financial and within the media, have conditioned our society to accept as desirable what is demeaning and destructive.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

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