THE WIT AND WISDOM OF MARY WHITEHOUSE

Mary Whitehouse stepped onto the public stage 50 years ago in 1964. To some she was the guardian of Christian family values, to others a self-appointed busybody. She spent decades campaigning for a responsible media and against harmful material. Ironically much of what we know about her views has come to us filtered by the media itself. This is Mary Whitehouse in her own words taken from the books she wrote during her lifetime.


April 2014

“There are enough words in the English language to get punchy and gutsy speech without resorting to obscenity.”

Cleaning Up TV, 1967

“Whether or not we switch off the television set, we cannot switch off from the society in which it exists and helps to create.”

Mightier Than The Sword, 1985

“In a society which is prepared to give pornography the adult seal of approval the child is immensely vulnerable.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“The laughter is ringing hollow as we realise the cost to our children of the mass-produced giggle.”

A Most Dangerous Woman, 1982

On television: “If it is sometimes a debasing influence, it could equally be a great ennobling force if we cared enough.”

Cleaning Up TV, 1967

“Behind the persuasive talk of those who equate freedom with a lowering of the age of consent there lies a streak of cruelty and exploitation.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“Pornography is an ideological weapon.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“Film is a glamorising medium and it can – and does – glamorise evil as well as good.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Television makes far more impact than the printed word… one picture is worth a thousand words in animated, coloured, close up”

Mightier Than The Sword, 1985

“Porn is the enemy of a healthy sex life.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“Viewers have a right to try to uphold standards which they feel important; not only in their own homes but the quality of culture generally. That is not a triviality.”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“It’s important that children grow up with a positive, balanced and healthy approach to sex.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“No movement, with the exception of communism and fascism, has practised censorship more rigidly than those who bellow for the abolition of all controls.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

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