THE WIT AND WISDOM OF MARY WHITEHOUSE

Mary Whitehouse stepped onto the public stage 50 years ago in 1964. To some she was the guardian of Christian family values, to others a self-appointed busybody. She spent decades campaigning for a responsible media and against harmful material. Ironically much of what we know about her views has come to us filtered by the media itself. This is Mary Whitehouse in her own words taken from the books she wrote during her lifetime.


February 2014

“A simple choice: between genuine freedom and total licence, between cultural responsibility and cultural anarchy.”

A Most Dangerous Woman, 1982

What we are is inseparable from the cumulative effect of all we have seen, read and experienced.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

It was the failure of the broadcasting professionals to seek to understand the impact of their work upon people.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

Pornography is an emasculation in which there is no mutual exchange of emotion and tenderness.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

Censorship, effectively but sparingly used, is a liberal concept since it would protect the lifestyle of the vast majority”

Quite Contrary, 1993

“If violence is constantly portrayed as normal on the television screen that will help to create a violent society.”

Mightier Than The Sword, 1985

“None of us can avoid the all-pervasive sex sells syndrome which is fundamental to the advertising industry.”

Whatever Happened to Sex, 1977

“The onus is surely on the Broadcasting Authorities to act on behalf of the public.”

From a letter to the Chairman of the Independent Television Authority, 1968

“TV:  the most powerful medium ever to affect the thinking and behaviour of people.”

Mightier Than The Sword, 1985

“It is this moving of sex away from people into a commercialised and non-personal setting which militates totally against healthy sex and love.”

Who Does She Think She Is, 1971

“We trivialise the argument about what is and what is not acceptable in public and private attitudes and behaviour if we reduce the issue to personal taste.”

Quite Contrary, 1993